Healthy Recipe Ideas

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As we near the end of the holiday season full of treats, we could all use some Healthy Recipe Ideas to start the new year off right!
As we near the end of the holiday season full of treats, we could all use some Healthy Recipe Ideas to start the new year off right!
Surprisingly, I did pretty well this year. That is, opposed to every single holiday season of my life.  Typically, we host Thanksgiving which means I get to enjoy daily leftovers for a solid week, and boy do I enjoy those leftovers. This year, we went to a friend’s house which was awesome, but I didn’t partake in leftover consumption (which is probably a good thing). Second, even though I made an abundant amount of holiday treats, I really didn’t eat that many.  I cut back on my added sugar intake back in July after my sister made some very direct comments about the size of my thighs, and it actually paid off!  I’ve been able to shed a good ten pounds since then and my sugar cravings have decreased. So, instead of throwing it all out the window during the holidays and asking for forgiveness in January, I’ve been a good girl. That doesn’t mean that I won’t join everyone else and eat healthy in January, and all of these recipes look so amazing!
Here’s to a healthy and happy YOU in 2017!!!
 3 Ingredient Chocolate Protein Pancakes
 Healthy Sweet & Sour Chicken
 Strawberry Vanilla Overnight Oatmeal

 

 Avgolemono Greek Chicken Zoodle Soup

 

 Broccoli & Cheese Stuffed Spaghetti Squash

 

 Brown Butter Sweet Potato Noodles

 

 Chicken & Avocado Burritos

 

 Chicken & Brussels Sprouts with Mustard Sauce

 

 Curry Roasted Butternut Squash and Apple Dip

 

 Fruit Salsa and Homemade Cinnamon Chips

 

 Greek Chicken Souvlaki

 

 Mediterranean Orzo Salad

 

 Sea Bass with Tomatoes, Olives, and Capers
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How to Make Strawberry Rhubarb Jam

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Canning in jars is easy when you know How to Make Strawberry Rhubarb Jam from fresh rhubarb, strawberries, sugar and lemon without pectin.

Canning in jars is easy when you know How to Make Strawberry Rhubarb Jam from fresh rhubarb, strawberries, sugar and lemon without pectin.This may have been the best jam, or preserves, or jelly… or whatever you want to call it…  I have ever made. No. Ever enjoyed. It was that good.  I will tell you why.

Canning in jars is easy when you know How to Make Strawberry Rhubarb Jam from fresh rhubarb, strawberries, sugar and lemon without pectin.

First of all, I used the best possible strawberries in the world. They are called Hood strawberries.  Prized for their bright red color and exceptionally large size, Hood strawberries emerged from Oregon’s Hood River Valley in 1965. They grow best in the Western States, but if you really know what you’re doing in the garden, I’m sure you can figure out how to grow them in your neck of the woods. They only have one harvest each year as opposed to plants that continue producing all season long, and its like a feeding frenzy when they’re offered at the farmers markets.

Canning in jars is easy when you know How to Make Strawberry Rhubarb Jam from fresh rhubarb, strawberries, sugar and lemon without pectin.But, I actually use more than twice the amount of rhubarb in this recipe than I do strawberries. I do this for a few reasons. First, rhubarb is much cheaper than strawberries (at least mine was). Second, if you’re not going to use pectin, you need a lot of sugar in order to get your jam to gel up. Strawberries are already incredibly sweet, so the addition of a ton of sugar is just nauseating. Rhubarb, however, is incredibly tart, so the addition of sugar makes everything right in the world. I saw a lot of recipes online that called for a heck of a lot more sugar than I used and let me tell you – if you’re using good quality sweet strawberries, I wouldn’t put any more sugar than what my recipe calls for. The balance was perfect as was the final consistency.

As much pleasure as I would have taken in devouring all four cups with a spoon and some crusty white bread, I decided to can four jars of this liquid gold for the winter months when I’m craving the summer bounty that had long since come and gone. I did, however, get enough extra to fill this little dish which made for some incredibly tasty treats.  If you don’t want to can the jam, it will keep in the refrigerator for a couple of weeks, but let’s face it – canning is fun!  So preserve it!

Canning in jars is easy when you know How to Make Strawberry Rhubarb Jam from fresh rhubarb, strawberries, sugar and lemon without pectin.

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Strawberry Rhubarb Jam
 
Prep time
Cook time
Total time
 
Canning in jars is easy when you know How to Make Strawberry Rhubarb Jam from fresh rhubarb, strawberries, sugar and lemon without pectin.
Author:
Recipe type: spread, breakfast
Yields: 4 cups
Ingredients
  • 5 cups rhubarb (about 3 large stalks), cut into 1⁄2" cubes
  • 2 cups hulled and halved strawberries (about 1 pint)
  • 2 1⁄4 cups sugar
  • 1 tablespoon fresh lemon juice (from about half of a large lemon)
Instructions
  1. Combine all ingredients in a medium to large saucepan over medium heat. Once mixture starts to bubble, reduce heat to medium low. You'll want the heat set to the point where it continues to bubble but not violently when stirred (you'll understand once you start cooking if jam bubbles start to pop out of the center of the pot). Continue to cook, stirring occasionally, until the jam has thickened. Plan on cooking jam for about an hour and temperature of the mixture is over 205 degrees F.
  2. While the jam is cooking, sterilize four 1-cup jelly glass jars plus their rings and lids. I do this by boiling them in water for 10 minutes or I boil the lids and run the rings and glass jars through the dishwasher.
  3. Transfer sterilized jars, lids, and bands to a clean dish towel.
  4. Have a very large covered pot of boiling water ready. There needs to be enough water in the pot so that when the filled jars are submerged, they're covered by at least 1" of water.
  5. Fill each jar with hot jam, leaving at least 1⁄4" of space at the top. Place lids on jars, and secure ring bands. Secure just tight enough so that they are hand tightened but you can easily unscrew.
  6. Transfer filled jars to pot of gently boiling water and let boil for 10 minutes. Transfer jars, set at least 1" apart, to a dish towel and let cool, undisturbed, for 24 hours. You should hear the seals on the lids pop pretty soon after removing from the water.
  7. If any jar is not fully sealed, or you chose to skip the canning process, jam should be refrigerated and used within 2 weeks. Sealed jars will keep, in a cool, dark place, for up to a year.

Canning in jars is easy when you know How to Make Strawberry Rhubarb Jam from fresh rhubarb, strawberries, sugar and lemon without pectin.
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